JUNE BOTM: Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson (YA/Poetry/Memoir) - Hardcover & Paperback

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In vivid poems, Jacqueline Woodson shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement.

Choose from several BOTM options. Visit BOTM: How it works to learn more

  • Classic Box will include a Tuma bookmark, Tuma's Books and Things pen, and other small gifts, such as stickers, pins, note-tags, etc. Gifts vary by month and season. See current BOTM books for specific details. 
  • Minimalist Box will include book and bookmark, along with personalized note.
  • Add-on will ship with purchase of classic, deluxe, or minimalist box.

Interested in other Jacqueline Woodson books? Such as Red at the Bone, Another Brooklyn, If You Come Softly, Miracle Boys, or Hush. Place a special book order request here.

About the Book:

Jacqueline Woodson about Brown Girl Dreaming

Brown Girl Dreaming tells the story of my childhood, in verse. Raised in South Carolina and New York, I always felt halfway home in each place. In these poems, I share what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and my growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement.
It also reflects the joy of finding my voice through writing stories, despite the fact that I struggled with reading as a child. My love of stories inspired and stayed with me, creating the first sparks of the writer I was to become.

Where it takes place:
Columbus, Ohio, Greenville, South Carolina and Brooklyn, New York

Where I wrote it:
In all of those places but mostly in Brooklyn.

Why I wrote it:
I wanted to understand who my mom was before she was my mother and I wanted to understand exactly how I became a writer. So I started researching my life, asking relatives and talking to friends – and mostly, just letting myself remember.

Synopsis:

Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement. Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a child’s soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodson’s eloquent poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become.